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COVID deaths down as liberal predictions fail to come true

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A new peer-reviewed study shows that COVID death rates have dropped by 336 percent since the beginning of the pandemic, which study authors say is because doctors are getting better at treating the illness.

And despite the good news, the country is still witnessing a drumbeat of predictions that forecast doom.

While some attribute the drop in deaths to the fact that younger people are getting sick at higher rates than at the beginning of the pandemic, the study says that’s not true.

https://twitter.com/NPR/status/1318737249207537665

“They adjusted for factors including age and other diseases, such as diabetes, to rule out the possibility that the numbers had dropped only because younger, healthier people were getting diagnosed. They found that death rates dropped for all groups, even older patients by 18 percentage points on average,” says NPR.  

The study comes even as the mainstream media begins their publicity tour for a seasonal recurrence of coronavirus due to colder weather.  

“US Covid-19 cases will begin to rapidly accelerate in about a week, a leading health expert says, as the country’s daily averages keep climbing toward the summer’s peak and several states are setting hospitalization records,” says CNN today, just in time for the election.

Since the end of June, Dr. Anthony Fauci, still the country’s top infectious disease adviser, has been warning that the country would soon see infections top 100,000 per day.

“I can’t make an accurate prediction but it’s going to be very disturbing,” Fauci told U.S. Senators in a hearing held by the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee at the end of June according to CNBC. “We are now having 40-plus-thousand new cases a day. I would not be surprised if we go up to 100,000 a day if this does not turn around, and so I am very concerned.”

For the record, the numbers of cases peaked around mid-July at 75,000 cases per day, mostly fueled by outbreaks in Texas and Florida, before trending down to 25,000 at the start of September. Cases are slowly inching back up and stand at nearly 60,000 per day.

https://twitter.com/MySportsUpdate/status/1318598367191142400

Despite the rollercoaster case total, the average numbers of deaths have trended down, bouncing between 350 to 1,000 per day, after topping out at 2,700 per day in early May.   

“Look out for your mental health, because the normal response to this is people are going to get sad and upset, and maybe even depressed, so have access to mental health counseling,” said Peter Hotez, dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine this week. “In other words, put those belts and suspenders in and get ready.”

Actually, it’s just the experts who need the Xanax, not the rest of us. If the rest of us need anxiety medication, it’s a measure of how annoying and wrong the experts have been so far.  

The rest of us seem to be adjusting pretty well to the risks associated with coronavirus, getting on with our normal lives.

It was the medical experts, for example, who pushed the idea that playing professional sports was dangerous.

“Unless players are essentially in a bubble — insulated from the community and they are tested nearly every day — it would be very hard to see how football is able to be played this fall,” Fauci told CNN in mid-June.

Yet here we are, with professional and college sports, including football, almost getting the country back to normal, despite what the experts said.  

Time for the experts to do the same thing.

PHOTO: Fabian Sommer/picture alliance via Getty Images

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