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MSNBC contributor suggests GOP attacks on Warnock’s religion are hypocritical, cites outrage over anti-Catholic attacks on ACB

Mary Margaret Olohan, DCNF

  • An MSNBC contributor suggested GOP attacks on Georgia senate candidate Raphael Warnock’s faith are hypocritical, citing outrage over anti-Catholic attacks on Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett. 
  • “Why are Raphael Warnock’s faith and sermons fair game for attack but Amy Coney Barrett’s religious views not?” asked Sam Stein, who is also a writer for the Daily Beast.
  • While attacks on Warnock have focused on the candidate’s public comments and actions, many attacks on Barrett mostly focused on her personal faith and her family. 

An MSNBC contributor suggested GOP attacks on Georgia Senate candidate Raphael Warnock’s faith are hypocritical, citing outrage over anti-Catholic attacks on Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett.

“Why are Raphael Warnock’s faith and sermons fair game for attack but Amy Coney Barrett’s religious views not?” asked Sam Stein, who is also a writer for the Daily Beast.

“I don’t think I’m overstating matters when I say that the entire Republican Party said questions of her faith were off limits and, indeed, anti-Catholic,” he continued in response to another tweet. “The media did run stories. And those stories were condemned by Republicans for being attacks on faith.”

Stein emphasized that he thinks “those stories were fine,” and that he thinks “stories exploring Warnock’s faith and sermons are fine too (assuming done in good faith, pardon the pun).”

“But I’m wondering why Republicans who oppose Warnock are comfortable with those stories now,” he added.

Stein’s tweets came after Warnock’s comment that “you cannot serve God and the military” was widely reported this week. Warnock made the comment during a 2011 sermon that has sparked a backlash on social media. Warnock has quickly become a focal point of attacks from the right as he prepares for a January runoff for the Georgia senate with Republican Georgia Sen. Kelly Loeffler.

While attacks on Warnock have focused on the candidate’s comments and actions, many attacks on Barrett focused on her personal faith and her family.

Soon after President Donald Trump floated Barrett as his Supreme Court nominee, multiple media outlets falsely linked a Catholic group associated with Barrett to the fictional dystopian novel “The Handmaid’s Tale.” These outlets later issued corrections admitting that there was no evidence that People of Praise inspired the book.

Even before her 2020 confirmation hearings, Democratic lawmakers questioned Barrett about her Catholic beliefs during her 2017 confirmation hearings, suggesting that her beliefs might make her unfit to serve as a judge.

“The conclusion one draws is that the dogma lives loudly within you,” Democratic California Sen. Dianne Feinstein told Barrett in 2017. “And that’s of concern.”

Media pundits and high profile Democrats also suggested that Barrett’s faith was extreme, and some went so far as to suggest that Barrett adopted her children for nefarious reasons.

Disgraced former Democratic Rep. Katie Hill tweeted: “If her religion never made it into her court decisions, she can believe what she wants. But, yes, personally, I DO object to any religion that still insists women be subservient.”

The Washington Post’s Ron Charles highlighted Barrett’s comment that the ultimate goal in life is to build “the Kingdom of God.”

“Amy Coney Barrett, the judge at the top of Trump’s list to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg, has said we should always remember that a ‘legal career is but a means to an end … and that end is building the Kingdom of God,’” Charles tweeted.

Filmmaker Arlen Parsa called Barrett a “Catholic extremist with 7 children” in a since deleted tweet, hitting Barrett for her pro-life views while noting that he will vote for pro-abortion 2020 presidential candidate Joe Biden, who is also Catholic.

“She wants the rest of American women to be stuck with her extreme lifestyle,” he tweeted.

Democratic activist Dana Houle said that he would “love to know which adoption agency Amy Coney Barrett and her husband used to adopt the two children they brought here from Haiti.”

“Does the press even investigate details of Barrett’s adoptions from Haiti,” he asked. “Some adoptions from Haiti were legit. Many were sketchy as hell. And if press learned they were unethical and illegal adoptions, would they report it? Or not, bc it involves her children.”

“Would it matter if her kids were scooped up by ultra-religious Americans, or Americans weren’t scrupulous intermediaries and the kids were taken when there was family in Haiti? I dunno. I think it does, but maybe it doesn’t, or shouldn’t,” Houle said.

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Founded by Tucker Carlson, a 25-year veteran of print and broadcast media, and Neil Patel, former chief policy adviser to Vice President Dick Cheney, The Daily Caller News Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit providing original investigative reporting from a team of professional reporters that operates for the public benefit.

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